What is Adjectives? (Degrees of Comparison) – Easy to Learn Guide with examples

What is Adjectives

Adjectives are words that describe the qualities or states of being of nouns. E.g.  Happy, fast, big, old. An adjective can add color and life to your sentence, and it can add important information.

  1. That cat is big.
  2. We will not drive the old car.
  3. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  4. He was fast.
  5. The air balloon was yellow, big and round.

In the above sentences, big, old, quick, brown, lazy, fast, yellow, big and round are adjectives. All these words are describing or somehow modifying a noun.

Type of Adjectives

Adjectives come in three forms:

  1. Absolute,
  2. Comparative,
  3. Superlative.

Absolute adjectives describe something in its own right. It is a normal adjective that’s used to describe, not compare.

  1. She is a beautiful lady.
  2. It was a memorable trip.
  3. Priya is tired.
  4. Suresh is witty.
  5. My sister has a beautiful white dress.
  6. My handsome brother is solving a mathematical puzzle.
  7. Naina has an amazing collection of expensive, clay dolls.
  8. The big, blue, square box was gifted to me by my friend.
  9. I bought a pair of black leather shoes.
  10. I love the big, old, green antique ring.

Comparative adjectives are used to compare differences between the two objects they modify (larger, smaller, faster, higher). Or, it is also used to compare the state of an object at different time.

  1. My house is bigger than that one.
  2. This red flower is more beautiful than the pink one.
  3. I am taller than my sister.
  4. Raman is more intelligent than his brother.
  5. My job is worse than yours.
  6. I made my cough sound worse than it actually was.
  7. His cat is larger than my dog.
  8. This book is more boring than the last one.
  9. Suresh is funnier than Mahesh.
  10. This swimming pool is bigger than that one.

Superlative adjectives are used to describe an object which is at the upper or lower limit of a quality (the tallest, the smallest, the fastest, the highest).

  1. Sushma is the eldest of the four sisters.
  2. The white puppy is the sleepiest puppy of the litter.
  3. This is the prettiest dress in the shop.
  4. Jonathan is the most handsome man on campus.
  5. This is the worst phase of my life.
  6. I lost my most comfortable shoes.
  7. Salman is playing the kind of role that suits him best.
  8. This is the most crucial match of the season.
  9. That is by far, the tallest tree I have ever seen in my entire life.
  10. Mr. Mohan is the best teacher.

Comparative and Superlative for adjectives

One Syllable Adjective

We can form comparative and superlative of one syllable adjectives by putting ‘er’ or ‘est’ at the end of the adjectives respectively.

  • If a one-syllable adjective ends in a single vowel letter followed by a single consonant letter, the consonant letter is doubled, e.g. thin – thinner/thinnest, big – bigger/biggest.
  • If an adjective ends in -e, this is removed when adding -er/-est, e.g. wide – wider/widest.
  • If an adjective ends in a consonant followed by -y, -y is replaced by –I when adding -er/-est, e.g. dry – drier/driest.
Absolute Comparative Superlative
 bright    
 tall
 small high sharp hard

light

safe

brave

nice

fine

ripe

fat

big

sad

soft

thin

wide

dry

 brighter
 taller
 smaller higher sharper harder

lighter

safer

braver

nicer

finer

riper

fatter

bigger

sadder

softer

thinner

wider

drier

 brightest
 tallest
 smallest highest sharpest hardest

lightest

safest

bravest

nicest

finest

ripest

fattest

biggest

saddest

softest

thinnest

widest

driest

 

Two Syllable Adjective

For two syllable adjectives ending in e, y, er, ly, we normally put er or est at the end of the adjectives.

  • If an adjective ends in a consonant followed by -y, -y is replaced by –I when adding -er/-est. e.g., happy – happier/happiest.
  • If an adjective ends in -e, this is removed when adding -er/-est. e.g. simple – simpler/simplest.
  • Two-syllable adjectives ending in -ed, -ing, -ful, or -less always form the comparative with more and the superlative with most.
Absolute Comparative Superlative
 happy
 funny
 clever
 silly
 pretty
 early
 noisy
 quietbusysimplelucky

tidy

worried

boring

careful

useless

 happier
 funnier
 cleverer
 sillier
 prettier
 earlier
 noisier
 quieterbusiersimplerluckier

tidier

more worried

more boring

more careful

more useless

 happiest
 funniest
 cleverest 
 silliest
 prettiest
 earliest
 noisiest
 quietestbusiestsimplestluckiest

tidiest

most worried

most boring

most careful

most useless

 

Three Syllable Adjective

We can form comparative and superlative of three or more syllable adjectives by putting more or most before the adjectives.

 Absolute Comparative Superlative
 interesting
 important
 frightening
 amusing
 expensive doubtful obscure often
 more interesting
 more important
 more frightening
 more amusing
 more expensive more doubtful more obscure more often
 most interesting
 most important
 most frightening
 most amusing
 most expensivemost doubtful most obscure most often

 

Some adjectives have irregular comparative and superlative form.

Absolute Comparative Superlative
 bad
 far
 good
 little
 many/much
 old
 worse
 farther/further
 better
 less
 more
 older/elder
 worst
 farthest/furthest
 best
 least
 most
 oldest/eldest

 

I hope this tutorial gave you clarification on what is adjectives and how you can use them to update your English language skills.

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What is Adjectives? (Degrees of Comparison) – Easy to Learn Guide with examples
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